By Xavier Surentherathas, Business Development Director, SSCS APAC

Now that 71% of the world’s largest companies are using Third Party Maintenance for post-warranty servers, storage and networking hardware, the Third Party Hardware Maintenance industry is becoming a popular method to effectively contain IT costs and reduce operating expense. Instead of competing with OEMs and offering savings of 50-60%, in many new opportunities Third Party Maintainers (TPMs) are competing against one another.

Mostly, this is a good thing for IT procurement and data center management. But, sometimes it could be a bad thing. Some companies will continue to be price-focused and attempt to get the best deal among a few TPM provider options. Lean pricing might often be made leaner, but there is a point when one of these TPM vendors will sacrifice something to win the business. This enabled “race to the bottom” increases your risk and you’re not likely to be satisfied with your provider when choosing solely on price.

Now that I compete against other TPMs, my contacts will complain that my pricing is higher than others. I advise and caution them that other TPMs will dilute their back-up parts (and logistics) plan to further lower their pricing. Doing so significantly increases the risk of missed SLAs! I continue to explain that my company won’t take risks that are unacceptable or unknown to the client. I try to help them understand that enabling serves no one. Regardless of my explanations, these buyers kept their eyes focused on the ‘pot of gold’ they are about to save and follow the rainbow described to them by a competitor. The business is too often awarded to the lowest price provider.

In my opinion, transparency and integrity should NEVER be sacrificed to win business. Yet, Service Quality is often being sacrificed by our competition to provide the lowest pricing.

In more examples than I can mention, these buyers that have chased the ‘pot of gold’ come back to me in 5-10 months and tell horror stories about missed SLAs, including critical parts not kept nearby. They describe a miserable experience and explain that my advice was indeed accurate and fair. I’m not proud of being right. Instead, I’m disheartened by them having been misled and all the added costs associated with their dissatisfaction. It simply shouldn’t happen.

I suggest caution when TPMs proclaim they have the “best-service/value-for-the-price” and offer nothing to back-up such claims. Instead of blindly believing, ask for client references that are located near to your facilities. You’ll want to hear directly from existing clients to learn whether there were surprises during incidents, or whether they believe they’re getting good value for the service. Be sure to ask several questions that help you gather an understanding of their vendor’s transparency and integrity.

Rainbows are real, there are wonderful Third-Party Maintainers in the global marketplace. But, your standards for Service Quality should not be dismissed by any vendor, especially when they aren’t transparent about the increased risk while you’re wishing to further drive down costs. My best suggestion? Look to your independent hardware support vendors for great pricing but choose your provider based upon the transparency and integrity they demonstrate.


Xavier Surentherathas, Business Development Director, SSCS APAC

Xavier joined SSCS in 2014, bringing account development experience from Rentwise Sdn Bhd, Peremex Sdn Bhd and Basis Bay – approximately 14 years in IT, consultative sales and account management. Currently, he leads the APAC sales and sales support teams, but also sells directly and provides account management for key clients. A resident of Selangor, Malaysia, Xavier earned his degree (MBA distinction) from IPE Management School – Paris. At this time, Xavier is also pursuing his PhD in Business Management. In addition to devoting time to his wife and young children, Xavier has interests in music, movies, reading, international travel and health/fitness.

By John Donoghue, Senior Sales Executive, SSCS EMEA

If you’re responsible for hardware support contracts, or hardware OpEx reductions, but not yet familiar with the term, “hybrid hardware support,” let’s start with an explanation:

A “Hybrid Hardware Support” model describes when your in-warranty IT hardware (servers, storage and networking) are supported by the OEM, during the warranty period. Then, all or a portion of your post-warranty assets are maintained by an independent hardware support provider (also known as Third-Party Maintainer). This hybrid support model is strategically chosen to impact and reduce OpEx (Operational Expenses).

Top Three Reasons Companies Adopt Hybrid Hardware Support:

1. Significant OpEx reductions are very possible, freeing up funds for more critical initiatives. Click Here to read more.

2. Companies wish to have greater leverage against OEM tech refresh strategies or are already extending hardware lifecycles (especially in storage) thereby optimizing CapEx budgets. Click Here to read more.

3. According to Gartner, 71% of the world’s largest companies have already adopted a Hybrid Hardware Support Model to reduce OpEx, using funds saved for other initiatives. Now, more and more companies are exploring the best practices chosen by their larger peers. Click Here to read more.

Why Shouldn’t Independent Hardware Support be Commoditized by “Price-Only Focus?”

If a hybrid support model is a logical means to drive down total OpEx spend, why is it unwise to enable your IT Procurement teams to choose solely on lowest price?

About 10 years ago, and before the marketplace accepted the validity/credibility of independent hardware support, data centre operations teams often collaborated with IT procurement to vet hardware support vendors. The data centre operations teams deeply understood the risks to their environment’s stability, so they asked very good questions of vendors and were not fooled by those offering a lesser service quality– which can lead to increased risk. Their technical knowledge and real-world data centre experience helped to protect the company

These days, experienced data centre operation members are too rarely involved in hardware support vendor choice. Yet, they are absolutely needed to help protect the company. The concerning new trend is this: IT procurement staff are unfamiliar with the standards originally designed by Third-Party Maintainers to proactively earn the credibility they are now receiving. These very high standards were designed to meet or even exceed the standards offered by the OEM for warrantied hardware. Unfortunately, those new to IT procurement are unfamiliar with what to look for and resort ONLY to “lowest price” strategies, placing little-to-no emphasis on service standards designed to protect mission critical assets.

Data center ops teams understand the risks, very well. IT procurement teams generally do not.

Top Five Risks Your Business Can’t Afford by Having a Price-Only Focus?

All of these are rooted in “time needed to return to operation” – or what IT folks call “Mean Time to Repair (MTTR).”

1. Grayed-out SLAs & Diluted Parts Plans: SLAs are funny things because they can easily be diluted to reduce internal costs so as to maintain margin. Yet, SLAs cannot be based on assumption for any mission critical hardware assets. Some independent vendors are now keeping parts regionally, not able to be delivered for 24 hours. Will IT Procurement have a thorough understanding of which hardware assets can be down for 24 hours and which ones cannot? Will your IT Procurement team understand that the SLA must read “FE to arrive on-site with parts in hand” for critical hardware systems? System downtime will negatively impact external and internal clients – some clients may even be lost! Hardware support is much like insurance – you will get only what you’re willing to pay for. Regionalised parts programs only make sense for non-critical (often very old) hardware that you no longer rely upon for significant operations.

2. Muddled Call-Home Technology/Methods: All critical hardware has call-home potential. Call-home refers to a technology used to alert remote parties (your staff and support providers) when the hardware is about to fail, in the middle of failing or has failed completely. Good call-home technology will advise the location, the serial number and REF codes that describe the problem and the parts most likely needing replacement. Not all call-home is created equal within the independent sector. For mission critical assets, the call-home tools provided by your independent provider MUST be solid. In maintaining high standards for your Mean Time to Repair, every minute counts. You cannot hope that someone in operations will walk past the hardware and notice a flashing light in under one hour. If you’re team is enabling lowest price solutioning, then providers will begin to believe that they no longer need to invest in this important infrastructure, or even include it in your support agreement.

3. Subpar/Untrained Field Engineers: Not every independent support provider has a robust FE recruiting team that can find technicians that can service all the assets on your support contract. If your vendor vetting process does not include techs asking technical questions of the techs, you are very likely to get technicians fluent in laptop repair and 100% reliant on phone support. It can be expensive to hire the right field engineers. If your vendor is being pushed to offer the lowest price, this is absolutely one critical area in which they will cut corners to maintain margin.

4. Untraditional Lack of Flexibility: The independent hardware support industry has worked hard for 40 years to earn a reputation as being incredibly flexible, especially when compared to the one-size-fits-all approach of the OEM. Your team can simply not assume that flexibility is great but has no financial value. Client (incident/asset) portals, for example, are built by humans and in this industry are often customized or built over time to client wishes. Here’s one self-promoting example I can share: A leading brand car manufacturer asked us to modify their portal views so they could see activity/asset data in ways that aligned with their structure. Those requested changes were completed during the phone call and under 15 minutes. Do you think that real-time customization to special requests will ever occur in under 6 months when you enable a price-only focus among support vendors?

5. Disjointed Account Management: If you expect lots of adds/deletes to your support agreement, or are hoping to have a liaison with whom you can dialogue about communications improvement, don’t expect much if you’re enabling a “race to the bottom” in pricing. People’s time costs money. If you expect to get good account management, with timely and professional responses, you may not want to indirectly imply that your account management isn’t worth much.

Would you buy the lowest cost homeowners insurance in a hurricane zone? Would you buy the lowest cost car insurance for your 17-year old son/daughter? More importantly, who is helping you properly vet your insurance options? If you have expert resources readily available to you, do you not use them all to help you make decisions that provide the least amount of risk?

To me, it makes no sense to not have IT procurement working with data center operations when choosing vendors to build your hybrid hardware support model. Yet, too many companies are doing this – taking risks that they really cannot afford.


John Donoghue, Senior Sales Executive, SSCS EMEA

John joined SSCS in 2018, bringing account development experience from Software Solved, Software Planet Group, Integritie, Taylor Made Computer Solutions, CCH and Universal Computer Systems – approximately 20 years in IT, consultative sales and account management. A resident of Portsmouth, UK, John earned his degree (with honors) from Trinity & All Saints College, a B.A. in Economics. In addition to his passions within Information Technology, he is Vice Chairman of the Bognor Rugby Club and a member of the Regis School Parents Council. He is a self-described “Rugby Fanatic” and enjoys every aspect of the game.

By Glen Stevens, Senior Sales Executive, SSCS North America

Tracking HPE EoSL (End of Support Life) or EoL (End of Life) dates can be time-consuming and complicated. So we’ve built an EoSL Resource Library you can easily check any time, when it’s convenient for you. More specifically for HPE hardware, you can click here, or take a quick-glance at the list below.

These are the known HPE hardware models heading toward EoSL in the next few years.

Model EOSL Date
HP ProLiant BL460c G7 Blade 2/28/2018
HP Lefthand P4300 G2 4/30/2018
HP Lefthand P4500 G2 4/30/2018
HP ProLiant DL360 G7 4/30/2018
HP ProLiant DL380 G7 4/30/2018
HP ProLiant DL385 G7 4/30/2018
HP ProLiant ML350 G6 7/31/2018
HP ProLiant DL360p G8 6/13/2021
HP ProLiant DL360e G8 8/16/2021
HP Arista 7050X 96XGT 8QSFP+ FB AC Switch 5/3/2022
HP 3PAR 7000c Storage Systems 10/31/2022
HP 3PAR StoreServ 7000 10/31/2022

 

Next Step Considerations:

• Why not keep legacy systems that have reached “stable state” – saving CapEx & OpEx budgets?
• Is it vital to undergo a hardware refresh right now? Click here to read more.
• Instead of refreshing to new hardware, have you considered pre-owned hardware?

Feel free to also check out this SSCS white paper, named:

•  Enterprise Trends in Hardware Lifecycle Extension Strategies.


Glen Stevens, Senior Sales Executive, SSCS North America

Based out of Austin, Texas, this will be Glen’s seventh year with SSCS, and 20th year in leadership/sales roles after departing a respectable 12-year career in the U.S. Army. After leaving the army, Glen began his business career as a regional sales manager for Lipman USA and later founded and ran Smart Card Systems, out of Arlington, Texas.

Several years later, he founded and ran another start-up called, Scope Dope. Aside from his naturally entrepreneurial nature, he also held sales leadership positions at Canadian Payments and iWave Information Systems, a unique subscription-based data-mining service for non-profits. Glen enjoys music, playing guitar, traditional outdoorsman activities and seeing his 21-year-old son playing music gigs throughout the Austin area. His 18-year-old daughter is attending Texas Tech and is pursuing a concentration in Media & Communications.

By Joel Holder, Senior Account Executive, SSCS North America

Tracking IBM EoSL (End of Support Life) or EoL (End of Life) dates can be time-consuming and complicated. So we’ve built an EoSL Resource Library you can easily check any time, when it’s convenient for you. More specifically for IBM hardware, you can click here, or take a quick-glance at the list below.

These are the known IBM hardware models heading toward EoSL in the next few years.

Model EOSL Date
IBM xSeries RXE100 12/31/2018
IBM pSeries 550 1/31/2019
IBM BladeCenter JS12 3/31/2019
IBM BladeCenter JS23 3/31/2019
IBM DS8800 MDL 951 3/31/2019
IBM DS8K EXP MDL 95E 3/31/2019
IBM ECLIPZ Blade 3/31/2019
IBM i570 3/31/2019
IBM Power 520 3/31/2019
IBM Power 520 Express M25 3/31/2019
IBM Power 520 Express(R) 3/31/2019
IBM Power 550 3/31/2019
IBM Power 550 Express M50 3/31/2019
IBM Power 560 3/31/2019
IBM Power 570 3/31/2019
IBM Power 575 3/31/2019
IBM Power(R) 595 3/31/2019
IBM Storwize V7000 4/30/2019
IBM Flex System p24L 9/30/2019
IBM Flex System p260 9/30/2019
IBM Flex System p460 9/30/2019
IBM Power 710 IOC 9/30/2019
IBM Power 710/730 9/30/2019
IBM Power 720 9/30/2019
IBM Power 720 IOC 9/30/2019
IBM Power 740 9/30/2019
IBM Power 775 9/30/2019
IBM Power 780 9/30/2019
IBM PowerLinux 7R1 9/30/2019
IBM PowerLinux 7R2 9/30/2019
IBM PowerLinux 7R2 L2S 9/30/2019
IBM PS700 Blade 9/30/2019
IBM PS701/702 Blade 9/30/2019
IBM PS701/702 Blade 9/30/2019
IBM PS703 Blade 9/30/2019
IBM PS704 Blade 9/30/2019
IBM pSeries 570 10/31/2019

 

Next Step Considerations:

• Why not keep legacy systems that have reached “stable state” – saving CapEx & OpEx budgets?
• Is it vital to undergo a hardware refresh right now? Click here to read more.
• Instead of refreshing to new hardware, have you considered pre-owned hardware?

Feel free to also check out this SSCS white paper, named:

•  Enterprise Trends in Hardware Lifecycle Extension Strategies.


Joel Holder, Senior Account Executive, SSCS North America

Joel joined SSCS in 2018, bringing account development experience from Oracle, IBM, Rackspace Hosting and webOS – approximately 19 years in consultative IT sales and account management. A lifelong resident of Texas, and pleased to have returned to his hometown of Houston, Joel has been an active volunteer in worthy causes such as: Austin Pets Alive, Austin Habitat for Humanity, Central Texas Foodbank, Meals on Wheels and is an active committee member for both the Rodeo Austin and the Houston Livestock Show & Rodeo. A winner of numerous sales awards and honors, he is most proud of receiving IBM’s “Putting the Customer First” award in 2014. In addition to his volunteer activities, Joel enjoys reading and is an avid golfer.

Janne Kokkaret, SSCS Business Development Director – Nordics

Tracking NetApp EoSL (End of Support Life) or EoL (End of Life) dates can be time-consuming and complicated. So we’ve built an EoSL Resource Library you can easily check any time, when it’s convenient for you. More specifically for Fujitsu storage hardware, you can click here, or take a quick-glance at the list below.

These are the known Fujitsu storage models heading toward EoSL in the next few years.

Model EOSL Date
Fujitsu TX300 S7 3/31/2018
Fujitsu TX100 S2 12/31/2018
Fujitsu TX200 S6 6/30/2019
Fujitsu TX300 S6 6/30/2019
Fujitsu RX100 S7 12/31/2019
Fujitsu BX600 S3 6/30/2020
Fujitsu TX200 S6 6/30/2020
Fujitsu TX200 S6 6/30/2020
Fujitsu TX200 S6 6/30/2020
Fujitsu TX300 S6 6/30/2020
Fujitsu TX300 S6 6/30/2020
Fujitsu TX150 S7 9/30/2020
Fujitsu TX150 S7 9/30/2020
Fujitsu CX270 S1 12/31/2020
Fujitsu CX400 S1 12/31/2020
Fujitsu TX300 S7-B1 3/31/2021
Fujitsu TX200 S7 9/30/2021
Fujitsu TX140 S2 12/31/2021

Next Step Considerations:

• Why not keep legacy systems that have reached “stable state” – saving CapEx & OpEx budgets?
• Is it vital to undergo a hardware refresh right now? Click here to read more.
• Instead of refreshing to new hardware, have you considered pre-owned hardware?

Feel free to also check out this SSCS white paper, named:

•  Enterprise Trends in Hardware Lifecycle Extension Strategies.


Janne Kokkaret, SSCS Business Development Director – Nordics

Janne joined SSCS in 2014 as Service Delivery Manager for the Nordic region, but has 14 years of experience in IT support roles, support team management and sales. His background includes EUC (End-User Compute) assets, as well as data center servers, storage and networking hardware support. Janne now leads business development activities throughout his region, working with clients to meet the unique needs of each.

From his home near Helsinki, Janne enjoys spending time with his wife and children, any outdoor activities and is a member of a unique club of Tesla owners. This club meets regularly to test the limits of their Tesla, while proving to the world that performance is not sacrificed by choosing a Tesla automobile.

By Michael Yost, SSCS Digital Marketing & Design Manager

In 2016, Mondelez International (makers of Toblerone Swiss chocolate) decided to quietly cut the size of the chocolate bar by widening the spaces between its iconic triangle-array bars while maintain the original overall length. There was less chocolate, and the price remained the same. Chocolate lovers all over the world noticed this and made their concerns well known in the media and online. The difference in the gap size was easily noticeable, but unfortunately some TPMs (Third-Party Maintainers) have begun to do the same.

In Any Race to the Bottom, No One Wins

As the TPM industry has grown, so too has the number of gold prospectors (investment) looking to find and maximize their profit. New investors have arrived to make as much money as possible and are not necessarily making operational choices that serve their clients, or the reputation for Service Quality, which this industry has worked hard to earn. Consequently, many of these TPMs have begun to dilute those service standards which have been generally accepted as “tenet of solid service.” Most importantly, such “tenets of solid service” were carefully established at the direct requests of experienced data center clients seeking support that maintained reliability and resiliency for their hardware environment. The concern is that these shifts and the risks they represent are not recognized until something bad has happened.

While many in IT Procurement are focused on price, few take the time to thoroughly examine the root causes of why select vendors continue to lower their support pricing during vendor vetting. And, most also assume that no TPM would ever risk the longevity of the relationship – or the stability of their data center environment – by diluting or eliminating elements of the service. Might this race to the bottom be enabling too many IT risks? Click Here to read a blog related to this very subject.

Gartner Research explained that there are two types of TPM providers: “Pure-Play TPMs” and “Secondary Hardware TPMs.” Even though both offer independent hardware support, they have very different business objectives. Pure-Play TPMs solely focus on data center hardware maintenance. Secondary Hardware TPMs offer hardware maintenance, but their main line of business is secondary hardware sales. This difference is key in distinguishing the motives and capabilities of the maintenance provider you may choose. Might one be more service driven than the other? Does one have greater motivation to continue to invest in support mechanisms and infrastructure?

If you are going to be entrusting your business’ digital infrastructure to any support provider, do the terms outside support, external support, or backline support give you a burst of confidence? There is nothing assuring about a company, with whom you’ve established an agreement, that turns right around and hands 99% of the service delivery over to a company – about whom you know nothing. Would you rather have full transparency so you can properly vet vendors or do you instead enjoy such surprises? Many of these secondary hardware TPMs have few field engineers or keep their support staff to a minimum and will look for the lowest cost partner they can find to cover the basics of their agreement with your company.

Spare parts and logistics are BIG differentiators between the direction a few TPMs are going and the way sparing/logistics SHOULD be done. It has become an industry expectation that when a field engineer showed up on-site to fix a problem, the client is expecting for them to have part in hand. A few TPMs have taken advantage of your assumptions or expectations. Instead, these few are now following the OEM business model of regional distribution centers, that could take a couple of days before the needed part arrives onsite. Phrases like “overnight shipping” or “regional parts depot” are used to hide their cost-cutting, but not margin-cutting strategies. It is also quite far from offering transparency with their clients. When did it become okay to dilute the marketplace’s expectations for the ideal SLA?

Nipa Chakravarti, CIO, Transalta Corp, summarized the behaviors of these unusual support providers best, “Over time, SLAs drive behaviors that are focused on delivering a minimum level of service at minimum cost to the provider. This forces IT organizations to become a commodity and not a strategic, value-added partner to the business. SLAs by their very nature are established as achievable contractual targets and can be static over time. Misused, they can be counter-intuitive to driving business agility and pace.”

On July 20th, Mondelez International (Toblerone Swiss chocolate) announced they will be reverting to the original iconic size. There are no signs that the TPMs who used the same strategy will be doing the same. If a chocolate bar caused this much outrage, shouldn’t your hardware maintenance support?


Michael Yost, SSCS Digital Marketing & Design Manager

This is Michael’s third year with SSCS, but he has been actively involved in html programming, website construction, SEO, graphic design and proactively driving social/digital engagement since he was in his early teens. In addition to his role at SSCS, he serves as an adjunct professor of digital marketing and design at a local community college in Houston, Texas. In his spare time, Michael loves engaging his family in outdoor activities and games that build creativity. He is also a life-long student of humor in the western cultures.

By Evandro Pasquarelli, Business Development Director, SSCS Brazil

Tracking Dell-EMC EoSL (End of Support Life) or EoL (End of Life) dates can be time-consuming and complicated – especially when the OEM makes it complicated to do so. We’ve built an EoSL Resource Library you can easily check any time. Or, you can bookmark this page for Dell assets or this page for EMC assets.

These are the known Dell-EMC models heading toward EoSL in the next few years.

Dell-EMC Model EOSL Date
EMC Isilon Switch MELLANOX 36-PORT QDR IB Switch 8/31/2018
EMC IQ Accelerator-x 10/31/2018
EMC IQ Backup Accelerator-x 10/31/2018
Dell Equallogic PS6000X 11/11/2018
Dell Equallogic PS6000XV 11/11/2018
EMC Connectrix – Cisco MDS-9124 1/31/2019
EMC Data Domain DD640 3/31/2019
EMC Data Domain DD670 3/31/2019
EMC Data Domain DD860 3/31/2019
EMC Data Domain DD890 3/31/2019
EMC Connectrix – Cisco MDS-3000W-PSU 4/30/2019
EMC Connectrix – Cisco MDS-9509-V2 4/30/2019
Dell Equallogic PS6010X 6/26/2019
Dell Equallogic PS6010XV 6/26/2019
EMC AX4-5 Array 6/30/2019
EMC AX4-5 AX4-5 Array 6/30/2019
EMC Connectrix – Brocade DS-5300B (4G Switch) 7/31/2019
EMC Connectrix – Brocade DS-5300B-8G (8G Switch) 7/31/2019
EMC Connectrix – Brocade PB-DCX 10/31/2019
EMC Connectrix – Brocade ES-5832B 12/31/2019
EMC Connectrix – Brocade PB-DCX-16EB 12/31/2019
EMC Data Domain DD620 12/31/2019
Dell PowerConnect 2824 24 port Gb Ethernet Switch 1/31/2020
EMC Data Domain DD160 6/30/2020
EMC Isilon S200 6/30/2020
EMC Isilon X400 6/30/2020
EMC Connectrix – Cisco MDS-9148 10/31/2020
EMC Atmos Generation 2 3TB – G2 12/31/2020
EMC Atmos Generation 2 G2 12/31/2020
EMC Data Domain DD990 12/31/2020
EMC Connectrix – Cisco MDS-FMS-9100 2/28/2021
EMC Connectrix – Cisco MDS-FMS-9200 2/28/2021
EMC Connectrix – Cisco MDS-FMS-9500 2/28/2021
EMC Isilon NL400 3/31/2021
EMC Isilon X200 3/31/2021
EMC Isilon S210 – 32GB DIMM 7/31/2021
EMC Isilon X410 – 32 GB DIMM 7/31/2021
EMC Data Domain ES30-15 SATA 9/30/2021
EMC Data Domain ES30-30 SATA 9/30/2021
EMC Data Domain ES30-45 SATA 9/30/2021
EMC Atmos Generation 3 G3 12/31/2021
Dell Unity 300F 1/31/2023
Dell Unity 400F 1/31/2023
Dell VNX7600 1/31/2023


Don’t Forget to Consider Your Options:

• Consider why you are refreshing: Why not keep legacy systems that have reached “stable state” – protecting your CapEx budgets and OpEx budgets?
• Consider the cost to benefits: Is a hardware refresh truly necessary and worthy of the cost? Click here to read more.
• Consider your hardware acquisition options: Instead of refreshing to new servers and storage, have you considered pre-owned hardware?

Consider reading this informative SSCS white paper, named “Enterprise Trends in Hardware Lifecycle Extension Strategies.

 


 

Evandro Pasquarelli, Business Development Director, SSCS Brazil

Evandro joined SSCS in November 2014, leading business development within Brazil, but also helping to support multi-national organizations with interests in the Brazilian marketplace. Prior to SSCS, he held sales positions in TIM Brasil, Alcatel-Lucent, Nextel, among other great companies. He has an MBA in Marketing from FGV – Fundação Getúlio Vargas. In his spare time, Evandro enjoys spending time with his family, the ongoing quest for happiness and work-life balance and cooking great food with dear friends.

By Steven Foss, Senior Sales Executive, SSCS North America

Tracking NetApp EoSL (End of Support Life) or EoL (End of Life) dates can be time-consuming and complicated – especially when the OEM doesn’t make it quite so easy. So we’ve built an EoSL Resource Library you can easily check any time, when it’s convenient for you. More specifically for NetApp Storage, you can click here, or take a quick-glance at the list below.

These are the known NetApp storage models heading toward EoSL in the next few years.

NetApp Storage Model  EOSL Date 
NetApp FAS3210 12/31/2018
NetApp FAS3240 12/31/2018
NetApp FAS3270 12/31/2018
NetApp FAS6210 12/31/2018
NetApp FAS6240 12/31/2018
NetApp FAS6280 12/31/2018
NetApp FAS3220 1/31/2020
NetApp FAS3250 1/31/2020
NetApp FAS2220 3/30/2020
NetApp FAS2240 3/30/2020
NetApp FAS6220 4/30/2020
NetApp FAS6220 4/30/2020
NetApp FAS6250 4/30/2020
NetApp FAS6290 4/30/2020
NetApp FAS2520 4/30/2021

 

Next Step Considerations:

• Why not keep legacy systems that have reached “stable state” – saving CapEx & OpEx budgets?
• Is it vital to undergo a hardware refresh right now? Click here to read more.
• Instead of refreshing to new, might there be value in pre-owned hardware?

Feel free to also check out this SSCS white paper, named:

•  Enterprise Trends in Hardware Lifecycle Extension Strategies.

 


 

Steve Foss, Senior Sales Executive, SSCS North America

Based out of Minnesota, this is Steve’s sixth year with SSCS, yet joined the organization with several decades of experience in IT sales and building solutions for the data center professional, as well as IT procurement. In his early career, Steve spent 24 years with DecisionOne, then created additional client value with roles at Northrop Grumman, StorageTek and Sun Microsystems.

Before landing at SSCS, he sold to a tight geography for two small Third-Party Maintainers, which were based in Minnesota. In addition to building value for his clients, Steve is passionate about fitness and visits the health club 6-7 times each week, rides bicycle and water skis in the summer months, cross-country and downhill skis in the winter months. Every day, over the lunch hour, Steve takes a 3-mile walk to enjoy the fresh air, but wanted all to understand his smartphone goes with him.