By Mark Havens, VP, Sales & Marketing, SSCS

OEM refresh strategies are not new, nor is the annoyance that many data center decision makers have with these self-serving sales tactics. Growing weary is normal, but those that have grown enraged have begun to deploy strategies that are rooted in greater logic, savings, service quality – AND actually, build greater leverage into their relationship with the OEM.

Typically a public company, the OEM is driven to please the financial interests of the stakeholder and failure is not an option. Development, expert staffing and promotion are very expensive. While your hardware assets are under warranty, these costs are passed along to companies that buy the new technology and these same costs are somewhat “amortized” across the warranty of those products, with profit margins consistent to the requirements of the board of directors and shareholders.

The very “essence” of the support you receive from an OEM is getting you to pay for great technology and keeping you as a customer. Building and deploying leading-edge technology is expensive and it must be recouped somewhere – some comes from the initial capital expense, but more comes from the support expense during that warranty period.

Here’s something to think about: At times, as you might imagine, you are paying MORE than your fair share of the cost to develop new IBM products. You may even be paying for infrastructure and strategies that limit your options, or force you to accept the next IBM tech refresh.Post Warranty Assets Choices

In any business procurement scenario, have you noticed what happens to your vendor negotiating leverage when you introduce competition – even for a segment of the business being done? Why not think this way about your post warranty IBM assets?

If your data center environment includes IBM servers and IBM storage, you may or may not have considered the support costs of your post warranty hardware assets. Certainly, IBM hardware assets have a support cost associated with each serial number. Paying IBM to support those older assets is NOT THE WISE USE of limited budget dollars. Most OEMs will increase their support costs once assets are post warranty – to drive you toward the refresh. And, those monthly costs increase more and more, the older those assets become.

40-60% savings from the price offered by IBM is normal when using a TPM. In cases where you’ve never before considered TPM, savings of up to 70% are not out-of-the-ordinary. In our industry, most TPMs can easily maintain all post-warranty IBM hardware your company has deployed: IBM BladeCenter, iSeries, pSeries, zSeries, Storwize, Power, System Storage, TotalStorage, XIV and IBM/Lenovo xSeries.

New to understanding the TPM industry? Here are a few white papers that can help:

1.“Understand Why 71% of Fortune 100 Companies are Now Using Independent Hardware Support”
2. “Still Unfamiliar with the Benefits of Third-Party Hardware Maintenance?”
3. “CIO/CTO Evidence: Enterprise Trends in Hardware Lifecycle Extension Strategies”
4. “CIO/CTO Evidence: Financial Impacts from Hardware Support Strategy Remodeling”


#TPMExpert #ExpertTPM


Mark Havens, VP, Sales & Marketing, SSCS

This year will be Mark’s 23rd year with SSCS Global IT Services. Beginning in sales, he was promoted to Vice President, Sales & Marketing, now responsible for all global sales activities, brand recognition, inbound/outbound marketing and primary messaging. In his previous employment in management with Ritz Carlton, Mark was highly influenced by their industry-leading customer service program, as influenced by the standards of the Malcolm Baldridge quality awards.

In his spare time, Mark is engaged is numerous activities with his daughter, plays the bass guitar and is a vocalist with a band and his church choir.

By Mark Havens, VP, Sales & Marketing, SSCS

If your enterprise IT infrastructure includes Dell servers and storage, perhaps you’ve already considered extending Dell server or Dell storage lifecycles to impact your OpEx (operating expense) and strategically delay your CapEx (capital expense) investments to refresh your technology. Or, perhaps you haven’t had the bandwidth to think about it, based upon departmental priorities. Either way, we would highly suggest a more engaged level of exploration.

Brand new hardware is expensive – simply put. And, sometimes your business drivers really do necessitate the investment. Speed, capacity and other factors may be vital to running the latest applications that promise to give your company a competitive edge. In such instances, refreshing to “shiny new” is often valid and worthy of the dilution to your overall IT budgets.

However, in other instances, you may not be making dramatic changes to your applications, but your older servers and storage are simply getting too old to operate effectively. Here’s where the depth of your choices may not have seemed so clear:

  1. You can choose “shiny new” and run mature applications on assets that offer more horsepower than necessary. And, then try to run your business on very lean budgets the next few years.
  2. Or, you can upgrade to newer, but not “shiny new,” saving on both CapEx and OpEx by choosing an independent hardware support provider. Remember how you used to “do more, with less” budget in college – making choices rooted in value?

Holding off capital expenses certainly helps address other needy budgets; however, there is additional value to your negotiating leverage by not refreshing in the same time windows as the OEM would prefer. When the latest technology becomes first available, pricing is not the same (much higher) than it is one year later. Moreover, let your industry peers and competitors deal with “early adopter” headaches often seen in first year operations. When you don’t do all the OEM suggests, you get their attention AND you’ll see better pricing, better bundled packages, etc.Shiny New Assest

Dell makes a great product – solidly built servers and storage. More so, they are far less prone to playing the anti-competition games as are the other OEMs. There, most definitely, is reason to be loyal to them. But, in those times when you need to do “more with less,” the depth of your loyalty does not need to mirror their definitions of a great relationship.

In the independent hardware support space (also, known as Third-Party Maintenance or “TPM”), support savings on post warranty assets run 40-60% off the pricing offered by Dell.

Certainly too, if you’re getting serious about hardware lifecycle extension strategies, most OEMs will increase their monthly support costs for post warranty assets. You’ve seen this. There is less overall value in having each OEM maintain the post warranty assets that they created…than it is to move all OEM post warranty assets to an independent that specializes in multi-vendor support.

Looking specifically to Dell servers and Dell storage support, most TPMs can easily maintain all the Dell assets your company has deployed: Dell EqualLogic, Dell PowerVault, Dell EMC devices, Dell Compellent, Dell PowerEdge, Dell PowerConnect. Assuming it’s post warranty, you name it, we likely can maintain it.

Note: In a recent Gartner publication, the analyst stated, “Currently, Gartner estimates there are more than 10 million data center/network devices under TPM, and 71% of very-large enterprise customers leveraged a TPM for support of some devices in 2016 [ID G00327263].” If 71% are using TPM and extending hardware lifecycles, why aren’t you?

New to understanding the TPM industry? No problem! Here are a few white papers that can help you better understand the remarkable value of this unique industry:

1.“Understand Why 71% of Fortune 100 Companies are Now Using Independent Hardware Support”
2. “Still Unfamiliar with the Benefits of Third-Party Hardware Maintenance?”
3. “CIO/CTO Evidence: Enterprise Trends in Hardware Lifecycle Extension Strategies”
4. “CIO/CTO Evidence: Financial Impacts from Hardware Support Strategy Remodeling”


#TPMExpert #ExpertTPM


Mark Havens, VP, Sales & Marketing, SSCS

This year will be Mark’s 23rd year with SSCS Global IT Services. Beginning in sales, he was promoted to Vice President, Sales & Marketing, now responsible for all global sales activities, brand recognition, inbound/outbound marketing and primary messaging. In his previous employment in management with Ritz Carlton, Mark was highly influenced by their industry-leading customer service program, as influenced by the standards of the Malcolm Baldridge quality awards.

In his spare time, Mark is engaged is numerous activities with his daughter, plays the bass guitar and is a vocalist with a band and his church choir.

By Mark Havens, VP, Sales & Marketing, SSCS

Data storage technology is just plain cool. And, the tech advancements in the last ten years has just made the world of storage technology even more cool. Both speed and capacity improvements are not only exciting but can deeply help business – like never before. These technologies allow one to dream of great possibilities and, potentially, deploy industry-changing ideas in their industry vertical.

Here’s where many companies are beginning to feel the rub: They want to invest in these new technologies, but feel deeply limited in their budget flexibility and simply do not have the executive buy-in to invest. “Budgets grew again this year by a few percentage points, but it would appear there is no way to ‘rob Peter to pay Paul’ so the new tech investment is possible.” It’s quite common to hear this lamented in discovery calls.

One of the most credible ways of raising lots of capital quickly is to take a “re-considered” approach to OpEx – specifically, hardware support budgets. More particularly, hardware support budgets for ANYTHING that is post warranty.

While trends within the storage sector are causing people to hold onto storage hardware for 5+ years (even 10 years, at times) due to stability and reliability, more storage assets than ever are post warranty. And, if something is post-warranty, why not consider alternative hardware support models other than what the OEM would lead you toward. Some of us refer to those strategies as the “OEM Refresh Treadmill” and that phrase likely resonates with your experience. Think it’s possible to build a better treadmill?

OEM Refresh Treadmill

Throughout the world, there is a rapidly growing independent support industry that has grown greatly in credibility over the last five years – even though several providers are more than 20 years old. For decades, this industry has been referred to as “Third-Party Maintenance (TPM).” Many of us in this industry really dislike that name because it does not directly address the real value propositions we offer to those who are more and more extending lifecycles of their SAN arrays, tape libraries, etc.

If you were to aggregate all your post warranty storage into one list, with annual OEM support costs itemized, this list would help you to garner support pricing from a few respected third party maintainers. On average, you’ll see aggregate annual support costs run 50-60% less than OEM pricing. Very old systems will see 70% savings because of OEM pricing models to fiscally force the tech refresh. But, even four-year-old storage assets will see significant cost reductions.

Over the years, we have witnessed hundreds/thousands of instances when a new client chose our company to support post warranty storage so they could drive savings necessary to conduct a capital expense for the latest awesome technology. It’s especially rewarding when the number of assets included permits the fiscal relief necessary to make the purchase – but far more savings than they expected, or even required.

In lieu of that OEM tech refresh treadmill that is hugely expensive, why not embrace a “TPM Treadmill” that allows you to buy the NEW cool stuff every few years. Quite frankly, once post-warranty is reached, the savings you’re seeking start to pile up exponentially. When “treadmills” were meant to be healthy, why not welcome a better model that directly serves your interests?

New to understanding the TPM industry? Here are four helpful white papers:

1.“Understand Why 71% of Fortune 100 Companies are Now Using Independent Hardware Support”
2. “Still Unfamiliar with the Benefits of Third-Party Hardware Maintenance?”
3. “CIO/CTO Evidence: Enterprise Trends in Hardware Lifecycle Extension Strategies”
4. “CIO/CTO Evidence: Financial Impacts from Hardware Support Strategy Remodeling”


#TPMExpert #ExpertTPM


Mark Havens, VP, Sales & Marketing, SSCS

This year will be Mark’s 23rd year with SSCS Global IT Services. Beginning in sales, he was promoted to Vice President, Sales & Marketing, now responsible for all global sales activities, brand recognition, inbound/outbound marketing and primary messaging. In his previous employment in management with Ritz Carlton, Mark was highly influenced by their industry-leading customer service program, as influenced by the standards of the Malcolm Baldridge quality awards.

In his spare time, Mark is engaged is numerous activities with his daughter, plays the bass guitar and is a vocalist with a band and his church choir.

By Mark Havens, VP, Sales & Marketing, SSCS

If your data center environment includes Oracle, Sun (or StorageTek) servers and storage, you may or may not have considered the support costs of your post warranty hardware assets. Certainly StorageTek (STK) and older Sun assets have a support cost associated with each serial number.

Paying Oracle to support those older assets may not be your wisest use of limited budget dollars. For those readers already embracing hardware lifecycle extension strategies, you have likely already considered independent support options to drive down support costs. But, for others, you’ve inherited hardware and may have no direct lifecycle extension strategy in place. You may not have had a chance to consider the value of independent support – or the credibility which “independent” support options are now seeing in the marketplace. If you fall into the latter category, this blog will help you better understand this industry – oftentimes referred to as “third party maintenance (TPM)” or “third party hardware maintenance.”

Typical Oracle/Sun warranties run about 3 years. At this point, the hardware is just beginning to reach “stable state.” This “stable state” creates a truly valid reason to consider support from an organization other than the manufacturer. Your team can easily embrace the financial rewards of the third-party maintenance industry.

40-60% savings from the price offered by Oracle/Sun is normal. In cases where you’ve never before considered TPM, savings of up to 70% are not out-of-the-ordinary. In our industry, most TPMs can easily maintain all post-warranty Oracle/Sun assets your company has deployed: SPARC, Ultra, Fire, Blades, Netra, Enterprise servers, StorEdge, STK

New to understanding the TPM industry? No problem! Here’s a few white papers that can help you better understand the remarkable value of this unique industry:

1.“Understand Why 71% of Fortune 100 Companies are Now Using Independent Hardware Support”
2. “Still Unfamiliar with the Benefits of Third-Party Hardware Maintenance?”
3. “CIO/CTO Evidence: Enterprise Trends in Hardware Lifecycle Extension Strategies”
4. “CIO/CTO Evidence: Financial Impacts from Hardware Support Strategy Remodeling”


#TPMExpert #ExpertTPM


Mark Havens, VP, Sales & Marketing, SSCS

This year will be Mark’s 23rd year with SSCS Global IT Services. Beginning in sales, he was promoted to Vice President, Sales & Marketing, now responsible for all global sales activities, brand recognition, inbound/outbound marketing and primary messaging. In his previous employment in management with Ritz Carlton, Mark was highly influenced by their industry-leading customer service program, as influenced by the standards of the Malcolm Baldridge quality awards.

In his spare time, Mark is engaged is numerous activities with his daughter, plays the bass guitar and is a vocalist with a band and his church choir.

By Mark Havens, VP, Sales & Marketing, SSCS

If your data center infrastructure includes HP servers and storage, perhaps you’ve considered extended HP server or HP storage lifecycles to contain CapEx (Capital Expenses) for a few years so budgets can be afforded toward other priorities or projects. For several reasons, lifecycle extensions can be helpful to you, your team and your departmental budgets.

Extending Asset LifecyclesThink about the typical OEM warranties – 3 years. At this time, the hardware is just beginning to reach “stable state.” Few issues, running smoothly, infrequent security patch updates – all of these things prevent distraction for your team members, permitting them to focus on projects and production efficiencies. Saving time can sometimes be critical to your current year objectives. By itself, “stable state” is a good reason to more closely consider lifecycle extension strategies.

Holding off capital expenses certainly helps address other needy budgets; however, there is additional value to your negotiating leverage by not refreshing in the same time windows as the OEM would prefer. When the latest technology becomes first available, pricing is not the same as it is one year later. More so, your industry peers and competitors can deal with “early adopter” headaches often seen in first year operations. When you don’t do all the OEM suggests, you get their attention AND you’ll see better pricing, better bundled packages, etc.

An unusual, but somewhat illogical side effect of hardware lifecycle extensions, is that monthly hardware maintenance expenses (OpEx) can be an issue. Most OEMs will charge a greater monthly maintenance fee for post warranty assets and those fees go up the older those assets become. Even HP will do this – but not as frequently as other OEMs. Your sales rep will explain that older parts are hard to find, and therefore expensive. He/she may explain that it costs much to maintain staff expertise in older, legacy systems. Come on!

Here’s the truth: These responses and this post-warranty maintenance pricing is only one small element of a very clever OEM tech refresh strategy. Don’t fall for it! Certainly, there may be viable business reasons that you have to refresh your processing or storage estate rather than to extend the life, but that decision should be YOURS to make without the influence of HP or any other OEM.

OEM vs SSCS Lifetime Costs

Your hardware lifecycle extension strategies can easily embrace the financial rewards of the independent hardware support industry – also known as Third-Party Maintenance (TPM).

40-60% savings from the price offered by HP is normal. In cases where you’ve never before considered TPM, savings of up to 70% are not out-of-the-ordinary.

In our industry, most TPMs can easily maintain all the HP assets your company has deployed: ProLiant, Integrity, 9000/SuperDome, 3PAR, LeftHand, EVA, libraries, etc. You name it, we likely can maintain it.

New to understanding the TPM industry? No problem! Here’s a few white papers that can help you better understand the remarkable value of this unique industry:

1.“Understand Why 71% of Fortune 100 Companies are Now Using Independent Hardware Support”
2. “Still Unfamiliar with the Benefits of Third-Party Hardware Maintenance?”
3. “CIO/CTO Evidence: Enterprise Trends in Hardware Lifecycle Extension Strategies”
4. “CIO/CTO Evidence: Financial Impacts from Hardware Support Strategy Remodeling”


#TPMExpert #ExpertTPM


Mark Havens, VP, Sales & Marketing, SSCS

This year will be Mark’s 23rd year with SSCS Global IT Services. Beginning in sales, he was promoted to Vice President, Sales & Marketing, now responsible for all global sales activities, brand recognition, inbound/outbound marketing and primary messaging. In his previous employment in management with Ritz Carlton, Mark was highly influenced by their industry-leading customer service program, as influenced by the standards of the Malcolm Baldridge quality awards.

In his spare time, Mark is engaged is numerous activities with his daughter, plays the bass guitar and is a vocalist with a band and his church choir.

By John Kolkmeier, Director, Global Service Delivery, SSCS

I understand that both Gartner and IDC estimate that the average data center (globally) contains 18-22 percent post warranty hardware assets. Why would you pay IBM to support post warranty servers and storage when a very robust market for independent hardware support has existed for over 30 years?

Did you also know that most OEMs will increase their monthly support pricing the older the server or storage device becomes? In all truthfulness, the independent hardware support (also called, “Third Party Maintenance”) market does just the opposite of the OEM – we almost always reduce support pricing as the hardware grows older. There are, of course, rare exceptions when critical back-up parts are incredibly difficult to find and quite expensive.

Breaking Piggy Bank on IBM CostsUnlike the OEM, we exist to save you money while providing you the best possible support. In such instances when older asset support pricing has plateaued, we’re likely to consult about hardware alternatives that are not new, but only a few generations old, which allows you to maximize your savings potential.

It is important to know that, on rare occasions, not every device is a perfect fit for third party maintenance. Reasons could include the instability of the device, ongoing software development by the OEM or a product could be a blended solution that includes support from multiple OEMs.

I believe it is the TPM providers responsibility to fully recognize these risks and be totally transparent with the client, thus not introducing any risk. I am proud to say that at SSCS we adhere very strictly to this service standard, which only increases client confidence in our support solutions. There are many times our legacy clients look to SSCS to provide this insight and depend on our vast knowledge and continuous training to provide the best path forward.

One last point I would like to make is the importance of creating leverage for yourself in any negotiation – especially true in long term relationships. If your post warranty assets are moved to a TPM, you’ll likely see better bundled (hardware and maintenance) pricing from IBM when you really do need to refresh that equipment. Also, when you hold the OEM financially accountable for hardware models that were launched before all the bugs were worked out, you’re less likely to be seen as an “early adopter” that will take risks with hardware and absorb the costs/risks when that equipment fails to meet its promises.

A hybrid support model, where the OEM is maintaining assets under warranty and the independent market is maintaining post warranty assets is rapidly becoming more common. I recently read a Gartner report stating that over 70% of Fortune 100 clients are using TPMs for a portion of their post warranty hardware assets.

Some are most likely focused on the cost savings, but I bet that most are adopting this hybrid model for the cost savings AND for the negotiating leverage that becomes possible. If you’re unfamiliar with the independent support industry, you’ll benefit greatly from reading this freely available white paper.

#TPMExpert #ExpertTPM


John “JK” Kolkmeier, Director, Global Service Delivery, SSCS

This year will be John’s 29th year with SSCS Global IT Services. A graduate of University of Houston, Clear Lake, most of John’s field service career has been with SSCS. Having several years of experience in direct field service and break/fix maintenance for multiple OEMs and platforms, John was promoted to Global Service Director eight years ago. All global field support and OEM subject matter expertise reports up to him.

In addition to his deep levels of interest in data center support best practices, John is an avid outdoorsman and conservationist, committed to non-profit groups dedicated to habitat protections and enhancement. He is also an avid fan of all sports, with a great appreciation for golf.

By Mark Havens, VP, Sales & Marketing, SSCS

If you’re reading this blog post, you either have an executive mandate to contain IT operating expenses (OpEx) or you’re open to server support models that differ from the OEM’s preferences. Of course, you already know that servers under warranty generally do stay under OEM support and your ability to contain costs do not kick in until the warranty nears expiration.

While you may or may not have more deeply considered extending the hardware lifecycle another few years, if you have not, you really should. Cost savings are remarkable and the market for independent hardware support is both robust and has built a reputation for incredible support and flexibility. If you know little about this market, you’ll benefit greatly from reading this freely available white paper.

Server Hardware Maintenance Costs You know that sometimes business drivers – especially software enhancements – push for the tech refresh and server lifecycle extension strategies are not realistic. Fair enough. Just make sure those involved in the software decision understand the hardware expense differential (Future OpEx minus Current OpEx) between current software tools and desired software tools.

Hardware OpEx is a huge part of your team’s budget and sometimes the deployment of software features may be delayed for a year or two to divert monies saved to a more critical project. Besides, this independent support industry (third party maintainers, aka “TPMs”) are very willing to help you do the research necessary so that sound decisions are made about hardware lifecycles.

Certainly, if you’re growing more curious about the magnitude of savings potential for extending hardware lifecycles, this hardware lifecycle white paper is not only educational, but going to be highly influential for your supervisor(s).

But, if you’re already on the “TPM Bandwagon,” that’s great. Of course, we believe you should be in dialogue with us. Most importantly, my advice to you is that you should be fully aware of the steps necessary to not begin a TPM bidding war that ultimately reduces the service quality (and flexibility) you should be expecting.

Something to Know – Get Accurate Pricing That’s Fair to Both Client & Vendor:

  • Getting server support pricing by providing only make, model and serial number increases your risk. Do the legwork necessary to provide full configurations so you’re not paying more than you need – OR, shortchanging the vendor and later surprising them with configurations that are incredibly expensive to support. Hardware support providers won’t work for free and your service quality will indeed be diminished from the industry norm.

Top Three Questions/Statements for Provider Candidates – to Separate the Wheat from the Chaff

  1. “If my objective is to reduce my overall server spend, how will you consult me so that your proposed options are balanced with ‘acceptable’ risk? How will you and your team discern what I deem ‘acceptable’ risk?”
  2. “Can you provide me your recommended sparing list for each of my post warranty servers?”
  3.  “How many parties could conceivably be involved in the delivery of the server support service you provide us?”

While this short list fits well within a simple blog, I could easily add another ten statements/questions that would be incredibly helpful to ensuring you get the service quality you deserve. If you’d like to hear more, I’d welcome a direct email or call. Or, you can simply watch for white papers we will be publishing in the very near future.

#TPMExpert #ExpertTPM


Mark Havens, VP, Sales & Marketing, SSCS

This year will be Mark’s 23rd year with SSCS Global IT Services. Beginning in sales, he was promoted to Vice President, Sales & Marketing, now responsible for all global sales activities, brand recognition, inbound/outbound marketing and primary messaging. In his previous employment in management with Ritz Carlton, Mark was highly influenced by their industry-leading customer service program, as influenced by the standards of the Malcolm Baldridge quality awards.

In his spare time, Mark is engaged is numerous activities with his daughter, plays the bass guitar and is a vocalist with a band and his church choir.

By Mark Havens, VP, Sales & Marketing, SSCS

Is this your first time as project manager for server or storage device relocations? Or, has it been a while and you’re a bit nervous that you can’t remember all the critical things you learned? This short blog is intended only to help you understand the three most important items to consider in any data center hardware relocation.

1. Providing Notice Well in Advance: Make sure that all key players are aware of your “move” timing not less than 30 days – ideally 60 days – in advance of your planned date. Various parties will need to be prepared for production delays/downtime, cabling changes, power and cooling changes, etc. Your move will go without a hitch if you communicate well in advance, allowing internal and external teams to help you minimize the chance of any unpleasant surprises.

2. Use a Team of Hardware Experts: No matter what anyone may think, your hardware is not a commodity. It is a valued business tool. A valued tool that has some sensitivity to mishandling. There are hundreds of companies that offer server moves, but have no concept of power down protocols, nor will they accept any accountability for the post-move return to full operation. Let the couch movers move couches, for heaven’s sake. If your team is unavailable or unable to handle, hire experts that know the hardware, its sensitivity and will hold accountability. I’ve heard horror stories about pick-up trucks being used, servers exposed to the weather, and bouncing around because the movers took no care to protect your mission critical business tools. Saving a few dollars will never be a viable response to damaged systems or catastrophic failures.

3. Make Certain Management Knows Your Plans and Rationale: Although this is very similar to #1, I chose to break it out separately because of its importance. In any equipment relocation, your reputation can go from hero to scapegoat in minutes. If your supervisor and his/her supervisor is fully aware of your plan, your logic and your timing, any burdens that arise are shared between you. You want them to “have your back” no matter how the project goes. They should also appreciate the logic you have about why you’re involving hardware professionals, as opposed to inexpensive widget movers.

If you’d like to have a deeper level consultation about hardware relocations, we would be pleased to share additional “best practices” for your unique situation. You could start by visiting this page to validate our expertise in IT equipment relocations: https://www.sscs.com/equipment-relocation.html You can contact us by completing the inquiry form at this page: https://www.sscs.com/contact.html

#TPMExpert #ExpertTPM


Mark Havens, VP, Sales & Marketing, SSCS

This year will be Mark’s 23rd year with SSCS Global IT Services. Beginning in sales, he was promoted to Vice President, Sales & Marketing, now responsible for all global sales activities, brand recognition, inbound/outbound marketing and primary messaging. In his previous employment in management with Ritz Carlton, Mark was highly influenced by their industry-leading customer service program, as influenced by the standards of the Malcolm Baldridge quality awards.

In his spare time, Mark is engaged is numerous activities with his daughter, plays the bass guitar and is a vocalist with a band and his church choir.